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Thread: Carving poplar

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Default Carving poplar

    I got some kiln dried poplar and i have tried 2 or 3 different types of projects, relief and vcarving and i get way too much fuzzies left on and in the cuts.
    I had heard that if you coat it with some sanding sealer first that may help but how deep does it absorb into the wood?

    If it only absorbs down say an 1/8th" and you are cutting .25 or more it doesn't seem to help...any advice from you finishers?

  2. #2
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    use the poplar as firewood and get some maple . poplar is too soft . is there a reason for using poplar?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by myxpykalix View Post
    I got some kiln dried poplar and i have tried 2 or 3 different types of projects, relief and vcarving and i get way too much fuzzies left on and in the cuts.
    I had heard that if you coat it with some sanding sealer first that may help but how deep does it absorb into the wood?

    If it only absorbs down say an 1/8th" and you are cutting .25 or more it doesn't seem to help...any advice from you finishers?
    You could spray the sealer on just prior to the finishing run.

  4. #4
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    I have carved poplar with sucess. It will just fuzz when carving ninety degrees to the grain. When it did this a little sanding knocks it off.

  5. #5
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    cnc routing, portland or
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    poplar is a stringy wood. resawing it is fun as it clogs things up.

  6. #6
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    Apr 2011
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    Stamford, NY
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    Even for paint grade applications in an industrial millwork shop. Poplar is substituted with maple often with rosettes, plinth blocks w/rosettes etc simply because of how soft it is. Getting crisp details against the grain is not an easy task. Tear out and fuzzy grain defeat the purpose.

  7. #7
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    Mar 2006
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    I was given a fairly good stock of it, and in the past, the poplar i had bought up at lowes carved rather nicely. But this tends to fuzz up. I am using a 90 degree centurion bit at 13000 rpm and 1.7 to 2.6 IPS. You can only go so fast when carving small details anyway.
    I don't think it was kiln dried as long as store bought poplar is. I have a friend with a moisture meter, i think i'l have her bring it over next time she brings me wood. This poplar is from a different source then her.

  8. #8
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    I do quite a bit of poplar, for 3/d stuff..I use quick drying painters choice..then leave for couple of hours then use steel wool and it smooths out really nice..

  9. #9
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    Mar 2006
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    Dan,
    give me a little more specific detail about "quick drying painters choice"

    Is that a brand name? a sanding sealer? a paint?
    Do you apply this prior to doing the carvings?
    Then do you use the steel wool by hand? If so, how do you get into the small crevices or carvings?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Painters touch, made by Rustoleum.. clearcote quick drying..spray cans, I use it for coating name tags it multicoats very nicely.. can be sanded in 15 to 20 minutes between coats..but for fuzzy carvings after carving, spray it completely it hardens very fast..in 20 minutes the fuzzies sand off with steel wool really easy and being steel wool it conforms to the contours very good..

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