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Thread: Help me finish this...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Garland Tx
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    Default Help me finish this...

    Recently I was challenged to try to create a document/lesson on router bits. This challenge was precipitated by questions asked on the forum by both newbies and more experienced users. I, and I'm sure others assume people know what we know, so when we give an answer to a question we cause more confusion.

    When I answer a question, It's based on my circle of experience... recently, an answer I gave on the forum was kindly corrected by another with more experience. This is what I hope to achieve with this document/lesson. I'm putting it out for peer review and correction.

    It is my hope that this can be a resource for educators, hobbyists, and professionals alike. I intend that no previous knowledge is assumed, and if a topic is not thoroughly covered, direction to more information can be given. To the experienced professional... what knowledge would you like to assume a new hire has? Help me document it here.

    Your suggestions are welcome both on the forum and by PM. And please, let me know if you don't wish to have your name included in the list of contributors.

    Steve
    EDIT:
    Please go to later posts in this thread to get updated versions of this document. SG
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by steve_g; 03-10-2012 at 08:10 AM. Reason: encourage updated document download

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    7,309

    Default

    one of these terms i have seen used I wasn't familiar with so i just learned something

    And who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Hobby-Tronics, Chiloquin Oregon
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    968

    Default

    I like the scope of the project and I think you have really good start. The biggest problem I had when I first got my Bot and therefore my first set of router bits was actually pretty simple. I had computer skills with NO wood skills. ALL of the router / bit terminology ASSUMES a knowledge of wood or substrates in general. I had no idea what the heck they were trying to tell me! What would have been very beneficial would have been a simple photographic comparison showing three things:

    1. a picture of a router bit, with brief text about it's intended use
    2. a picture showing a GOOD cut, and
    3. a picture of an abnormal cut, with brief text about the probable causes
    This chart would show lots of different kinds of bits, vbits, ball nose, tapered, 2 flute, etc,. Not more than 1 or 2 of each basic type. This would be followed by your much more technical description and further explanations of cause and effect.

    If you follow the threads on here we get tons of wordy problems posted regarding fuzzies, burns, broken bits, how do I . . . .etc, followed by a battery of knowledgeable replies asking for an example pix! Once the BAD / problem pix is posted there are a ton of really good solutions, such as speeds, bits, feeds, etc. So the photo chart would be my wish list. A couple of years later there are still a ton of substrates and bits I have not tried. Russ
    Last edited by chiloquinruss; 02-22-2012 at 01:31 PM.

  4. #4
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    Sep 2006
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    Default

    Thanks to all who gave input both on and off the forum! A general consensus would seem to be 'add many illustrations!" This is not surprising as those of us who like working with our hands tend to be visual learners...

    I will not search the forum for photos and risk using someone's image without their permission, however... if you have something you think may be pertinent and are willing to let me use them... please attach them here or send them to stevedotglasselatsgmfgdotcom. Just to be perfectly clear... there is no intent to make a document that will ever be any thing but free to those who want to download it.

    Thanks again for encouragement and ideas...
    Stay tuned for version 2

    Steve

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Blenheim. New Zealand.
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    Hi Steve,

    I find the document you are providing interesting,and would like to commend you for going to the effort and trouble and I am sure many new user's will find it very helpful.

    Once again, well done.

    Cheers and regards,

    Roger.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Garland Tx
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    Default

    Well... here it is Version 2.0 In an attempt to assume no previous knowledge, I've included more definitions and many illustrations. I have attempted to make it an interesting read... my wife says I failed... but she has no interest in the topic. Keeping the document "Basic" yet accurate is difficult.

    I'm still open to suggestions and illustrations and please check me for accuracy. The document is to large to post anywhere on the forum so the link is to my Google Doc.s account. Some of the illustrations do not display correctly unless you download the PDF to your own computer.

    I figure at least one more document revision will be necessary, I'm lacking especially in the areas that refer to metric tool sizes.

    Thanks again to all who offered support, suggestions and criticism.

    Steve G

    https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8G...THBEbmtBZk1mUQ

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Mission B.C.
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    Default

    Wow, very cool Steve. I learned a lot. Thanks!

    Rik

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    727

    Default

    Looks like that is going to be a useful resource for many users. You have done a great job.

    I would mention the aftermarket collets available for standard routers, and how they give you some of the benefits of an ER style spindle collet. I have a set of the precisebits collets and I don't know what I would do without them.

    I may have missed something, but I would suggest that the section on chip load could be improved by mentioning the visual, and audible, indicators of a chip load that is too light. (dust, smoke, screaming bit, etc...) I would also mention something about how the bit at least for most applications I am aware of should never be too hot to touch.

    The more practical considerations the better. It amazes me how many woodworkers are not aware of the concept of chip load, and this was something I was not aware of myself until I started working with CNC equipment. I have taught, and demonstrated to quite a few experienced woodworkers that the reason why their bit was smoking, and producing dust was not that it was dull, but that they were cutting way to slow with it.
    Michael Schwartz - Waitsfield VT
    Shopbot prs standard 48x96. Aspire. SB Link.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Diamond Lake, WA
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    I will start reading through it this weekend Steve and provide any feedback next week.

    Thank you, so much, for making the effort to put this very valuable document together. Being able to steer people to your document to "Read this first" then ask questions will help people get much better educated.

    Great Job!!!
    Don
    Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks, LLC
    www.dlwoodworks.com
    ***********************************
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece; But to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, bank accounts empty, credit cards maxed out, defiantly shouting "Geronimo"!

    If you make something idiot proof, all they do is create a better idiot.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hobby-Tronics, Chiloquin Oregon
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    968

    Default

    Another thing I have started doing more of lately is since I can't get really good wood most of what I cut leaves my bits really gooped up. If I don't clean them up when I finish a job it won't cut very good on the next job. So I got a bag of those brass wire brushes from HF and they do a good job of getting the sap / glue etc, out of the bit. And amen on the comment about keeping the collet clean as well.

    Great job and the illustrations are terrific. I also learned alot. In my past life in the computer biz when doing documentation we used a lot of icons for special notice. I.E. where you have a warning make a warning icon to highlight that so the reader begins to look for those warnings or hints or links or whatever.

    Keep it up you are doing super! Russ

    BTW do you need any pix of broken bits?

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