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Thread: Aspire vs VCarvePro

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    10

    Default Aspire vs VCarvePro

    VcarvePro9 is out and I have to decide on upgrading. My question is: How much better is Aspire. What can it do? I just want some opinions from current users. Can I make 3D models and cut surfaces on my Bot?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Marquette, MI
    Posts
    3,376

    Default

    Pete...
    VCarve Pro and Aspire will cut the same. Aspire has 3D model creation and manipulation tools, which VCarve Pro does not. So if you wish to create 3D models, then Aspire is your product, if you wish to purchase them, then VCarve Pro will do the job. If you own a ShopBot, you have the option for VCarve Pro ShopBot Edition, which is lower priced, but only has output for ShopBot machines.
    Gary Campbell
    GCnC Control
    GCnC411(at)gmail(dot)com
    ShopBot Controller Upgrades
    http://www.youtube.com/user/Islaww1


    "We can not solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them"
    Albert Einstein


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Garland Tx
    Posts
    2,247

    Default

    Pete…
    IMHO somebody has already spent the time creating most of the 3D files you might want, and are offering them for sale at far less than what your time is worth to recreate them!

    VCP will cut these files just fine and you can scale their size and depth. There are some caveats however… VCP limits the number of 3D files you can import into a single project. You can, however, break the project into several smaller projects if necessary. Also, several hundred 3D models are included with VCP and these limitations don’t apple to them!

    There are many web sites where you can purchase 3D models and many people reasonably marketing their design skills. Here’s just one source, eBay and a search for just one file format… STL.

    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...w=stl&_sacat=0

    For me, it doesn’t make sense to spend the time mastering the 3D design skills I’d need to make something marketable… But it may for you, especially if this skill intrigues you and you have the time to learn!

    VCP is a subset of Aspire and any time you invest in it is not wasted if you eventually decide to make the leap to Aspire.

    SG

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SOUTH CENTRAL COLORADO
    Posts
    1,138

    Default

    I bit the bullet a few years back to upgrade to aspire and then i paid to get one update. My skills are limited in creating 3-d components, but i do do some very basic stuff. Being able to add 3-d letters to a plaque is my biggest use. But almost everything i do is 3-d, but i do add some v carve to a plaque.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Marietta, Ga.
    Posts
    320

    Default

    3D doesn't have to be just decorative, such as flowers and faces, etc. I use Aspire quite a bit for making furniture pieces or sections that may have a shape to them. I am working on a project right now that will save a lot of time hand carving that Aspire and the ShopBot can do for me; (..and probably a lot better). Plus you can design and preview until you are satisfied with the results. If you do upgrade to Aspire you will still have V-Carve, but so much more...joe

    I just noticed that you are new to the forum..if you just purchased the ShopBot and got a fresh copy of V-Carve, you maybe entitled to the update for free. Check this out with ShopBot...joe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I have had my Shopbot for a long time. I bought it when the Alphas were just coming out and the PRTs were offered at a discount. I bought Vcarve when it was 7.0. Now I can upgrade from 8.2 to 9.0 for $175, or to Aspire for $1300.

    This only a hobby for me. In my day job I work in 3D all the time, (Solidworks), and program big scary machines with Mastercam and Esprit as well as 3D print.

    I appreciate the candid advise from actual users. Definitely upgrade and possibly go to Aspire.

    Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve_g View Post
    Pete…
    IMHO somebody has already spent the time creating most of the 3D files you might want, and are offering them for sale at far less than what your time is worth to recreate them!

    VCP will cut these files just fine and you can scale their size and depth. There are some caveats however… VCP limits the number of 3D files you can import into a single project. You can, however, break the project into several smaller projects if necessary. Also, several hundred 3D models are included with VCP and these limitations don’t apple to them!

    There are many web sites where you can purchase 3D models and many people reasonably marketing their design skills. Here’s just one source, eBay and a search for just one file format… STL.

    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odk...w=stl&_sacat=0

    For me, it doesn’t make sense to spend the time mastering the 3D design skills I’d need to make something marketable… But it may for you, especially if this skill intrigues you and you have the time to learn!

    VCP is a subset of Aspire and any time you invest in it is not wasted if you eventually decide to make the leap to Aspire.

    SG
    SO sounds like based on what you said, if I am creating 3d models in fusion 360 or inventor etc and then importing them into vcarve there is no reason to go to aspire? I have also done some direct cam output from fusion when I want more control over the milling strategies but vcarve is quicker and easier when I just want something simple done. It seems it is really hard to pin down exactly what extra functionality you get. The generic it does 3d modeling is vague and since I can use other programs to 3d model I can't decide if it gives ME anything over Vcarve pro.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Garland Tx
    Posts
    2,247

    Default

    Robert…
    If you are comfortable modeling in other programs that will let you save in formats that VCP imports (.stl, .v3m, .3dm, .skp, .rif, .3Ds, .acs, .prj, … 12 total) then I see little added value for you… unless you count the additional models included in the price.

    This is how I see it for me, but would like to hear other opinions and could be persuaded otherwise!
    SG

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Thorp, WI
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    The extent of what can be done with 3D modeling in VCP is... Import files of various 3D formats, change properties such as height, base height, fade & tilt, create a vector boundary of the model, apply smoothing, scale Z height, and slice. No other model manipulation or creation is available.

    With Aspire, you get that as well as shape creation from vectors, 2 rail sweeps, extrude, spin & turn, sculpting, texture, create from bitmap, export stl, export 3dclip, create component from model, create draft, offset model, and a few other operations.

    With VCP, you can bring in premade models and perhaps build something with them as far as a scene goes, but you can't do much for fine tuning, sculpting/manipulation.

    Try out the trial version to see for yourself and look at the various training videos as well.
    Scott

    If guns kill people, I guess pencils misspell words, cars drive drunk and spoons make people fat.

    "Those who hammer their guns into plows, will plow for those who do not" - Thomas Jefferson




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    405

    Default

    I have Aspire and use it primarily for sculpting and shaping furniture parts with the occasional v carving. I don't carve 3d scenes like you get with the models and the skills to make those skills are well above my skill set. I would probably just import a model if I needed one. I have commissioned Grant Bailey to do a model once. I use the Cad program Vectorworks on a Mac to create a lot of the 2d shapes I use because I have used the program for a very long time although I am slowly weaning myself from it. I also use Aspire for indexer work and, although you can do some with VCarve, Aspire opens more areas with the indexer. I find the 3d capability essential to my work and would hate not to have it.

    Steve Glassel is a wizard with the 3d work he wrings out of VCarvePro using the fluting and moulding tools. He has designed carved chair seats with the Moulding tool. I am constantly amazed with the creative ways he seems to use the program.

    A lot depends, as others have said with how you use it. I view my use of Aspire much like my Photoshop use. I feel like I use a very, very small part of the programs but that very, very small part is wondrous and has become indispensable.

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