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Thread: LEVER Sign

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricSchimel View Post
    Have you ever tried designing something in SketchUp and using the either the built in importer or the one that I've created?

    I'm just trying to get at to the root of the "Donkey Kong" comment. Donkey Kong was a really fun and easy to play game, so maybe this is a compliment?

    I suspect it's not. In either case, I'm building software to ease the process of going from design to fabrication and I appreciate feedback both good and bad so we can improve the software. "Donkey Kong" isn't really something I can take action on however.
    Have you tried adding flaming barrels to your software?
    And no, Aspire is not the only way to make sure the router does what you want it do do... Aspire is the only way some people know how to make the router "do what you want it to do".

  2. #12
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    Ha, there are no flames of any kind that go into the software

    Agreed, Aspire is pretty great (which is why we support it) but certainly not the only choice.

  3. #13
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    Perhaps we could see some really creative layouts by Eric. What would be even better is to see more of his signage. After all he has lots of sign suggestions!

  4. #14
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    I typically don't post a lot of projects unless it helps people with their workflows. One of the driving factors for me creating this software was doing complex multimedia projects like this:

    http://www.digitallyfabbed.com/#/arcade-machine-1/

    And this:

    http://www.digitallyfabbed.com/#/sound-proof-booth/

    And this:

    http://www.digitallyfabbed.com/#/foosball-table/

    These projects are all multimedia, IE they required not just the CNC, but a paint shop, vinyl/sign work, 3D printing, and even circuit board design. These projects all required 3D models so that the ideas can be communicated with the client, and also the same models were used for all of the engineering as well.

    Extracting the machining/printing/cutting/circuitry information from the models has always been a chore. In many cases it takes longer to get that information out of the model than it does to actually create the design. Things can get really time consuming when design changes are needed, or when multiples of a project need to be made but they have slight variations.

    That's why I'm creating software to make this data extraction easier. While the software isn't quite at "arcade machine" level processing just yet, 2D signs like the one I posted at the beginning of the thread are well within it's scope of capability, and I think really illustrate the potential for a lot of time savings for users, which is why I posted that project in the beginning.

    For those that are interested in trying the software, check it out at www.getfabber.com. It's a free beta right now.

    SketchUp+Arcade+6.jpg

    IMG_20180724_165055-01-01.jpg

    Foosball+Table+1.jpg

  5. #15
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    Nice work Eric. Now off topic of the sign, Sketchup from the little I have used it is not a parametric modeler correct? Is there a plugin that can make it that way? I like the capability of editing that parametric design software gives.

  6. #16
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    Keep posting Eric, I like how you think. I enjoy reading how people solve problems.\


    James

  7. #17
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    I sue like making money!.

    This looks like a looser.

    Joe Crumley

  8. #18
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    Joe, are you missing a few keys on your keyboard?

    Anyway, I'd take a close look at the joinery I've used on these projects, it's far from "looser".

    Or, perhaps you meant that it's a "loser" in that I didn't make money on these projects. You've challenged me in wallet measuring in the past, and I'm not going there.

    Thanks so much James. I'm happy to share my workflows and help problem problem solve. Let's hope that another thread doesn't get ruined by one bad apple.

    Brian, SketchUp does have parametric function in it called Dynamic Components, but it's not that conducive to modeling for CNC cutting. When you make something parametric in SketchUp you often wreck arcs and circles. I actually teach parametric design in SketchUp (and other programs) and can point you at some of my free online classes if you're interested. It's great for space planning however and cabinetry. I actually have a software product that I've made for that, and I'm happy to share if you want to see it but I don't want this to come across as an advertisement for software.

    I've been using both Onshape and Fusion 360 for parametric design. I greatly prefer Ohshape. It's parametric abilities are top notch. Check out this video:

    https://youtu.be/jsJ9xcFYMEM

    Joe, you won't find any "looser" joinery in there.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricSchimel View Post
    Joe, are you missing a few keys on your keyboard?

    Anyway, I'd take a close look at the joinery I've used on these projects, it's far from "looser".

    Or, perhaps you meant that it's a "loser" in that I didn't make money on these projects. You've challenged me in wallet measuring in the past, and I'm not going there.

    Thanks so much James. I'm happy to share my workflows and help problem problem solve. Let's hope that another thread doesn't get ruined by one bad apple.

    Brian, SketchUp does have parametric function in it called Dynamic Components, but it's not that conducive to modeling for CNC cutting. When you make something parametric in SketchUp you often wreck arcs and circles. I actually teach parametric design in SketchUp (and other programs) and can point you at some of my free online classes if you're interested. It's great for space planning however and cabinetry. I actually have a software product that I've made for that, and I'm happy to share if you want to see it but I don't want this to come across as an advertisement for software.

    I've been using both Onshape and Fusion 360 for parametric design. I greatly prefer Ohshape. It's parametric abilities are top notch. Check out this video:

    https://youtu.be/jsJ9xcFYMEM

    Joe, you won't find any "looser" joinery in there.
    Viz pro for SketchUp looks interesting for parametric modeling.
    I haven't played with SketchUp much since I'm a 3dsMax/Maya guy, so I can't really speak to its capabilities.

  10. #20
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    I've used Viz before and it is quite interesting. It doesn't support arcs and circles just yet. I've talked with the folks that make it and it sounds like that those features are on the horizon though.

    Here's an OnShape drawing of a table I make on a regular basis:

    https://cad.onshape.com/documents/c8...b1644ea30ba4c5

    If you click on the "Master parts" tab on the bottom left you can alter the dimensions of the table and it will automatically rebuild itself. Go back to the assembly tab to see the changes.

    Parametric drawings like this for something that needs to be made over and over that have variations are really useful.

    It's really useful for things like cabintetry as well.

    What are you designing and making in Max/Maya? And what's your process for getting from those programs to toolpaths?

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