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Thread: What would a normal high speed be for a BT48 Alpha

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Blaine Mn
    Posts
    316

    Default What would a normal high speed be for a BT48 Alpha

    I am still very fresh to my alpha machine and I am machining out the free wreath provided by Vectric this month. I have a large stock of HDU and that cuts very easily of course. I am running at 6 inchs/sec and it seems to be no problems and that got me wondering what speeds would be fast and safe for this machine. I am making 3 for gifts as the painting will be more efficient for multiples. We attended one of Dan Sawatzky's classes a couple years ago and still retain some of his techniques. Thanks Gene

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Looking at the specification page. It says an Alpha can use full cutting force up to 600 inches per minute. You are at 360 ipm running 6 ips. 600 ipm is fast. You will definitely lose quality the faster you go.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Diamond Lake, WA
    Posts
    1,605

    Default

    I cut plywood at 360IPM without problems on my 2009 PRS Alpha. Carving and v-carving I slow down some to get a better quality cut. As far as jogging, I jog at 15IPS no problem.

    You need a good fast comm speed between the PC and the controller to do that. Cutting and moving speed is pretty much limited to communications speed between the PC and the controller. The VERY outdated method ShopBot uses (USB) really slows down things and the faster you go the more chance you will have in lost communications problems. Those really suck when you're half way thru an 8 hour 3D carving project and you have to start over. But it seems to be pretty common.

    The thing you want to tune for is a combination of RPM and feed speed that doesn't let the bit scream when it's cutting. If the bit is screaming, you either need to slow down the RPM or increase the feed speed. Each machine seems to be different in what this sweet spot is. You just need to experiment for your machine.
    Don
    Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks, LLC
    www.dlwoodworks.com
    ***********************************
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece; But to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, bank accounts empty, credit cards maxed out, defiantly shouting "Geronimo"!

    If you make something idiot proof, all they do is create a better idiot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    iBILD Solutions - Southern NJ
    Posts
    7,931

    Default

    This is an old thread...

    The wreath project in 3d will cut faster than the frame is capable of running without it reverberating and transferring that vibration into the surface of the relief.

    Every relief is different and will run at a different speed in order to get the best quality. For instance, I've machined large smooth reliefs at 12 inches per second but smaller ones with a lot of details or up and down movement like a grill or egg and dart max out at 2,2 before reverberation textures the surface.

    There is no one speed for 3d. VR settings can help a lot if you know what you are doing but there's a limit.
    High Definition 3D Laser Scanning Services - Advanced ShopBot CNC Training and Consultation - Vectric Custom Video Training IBILD.com

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