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Thread: Pricing Installation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norman, Ok
    Posts
    3,251

    Default Pricing Installation

    Most customers haven't thought much about installation and when they are ready to place an order, they assume installation is part of sign price. I do my best to discuss this up front.

    I have a couple of installers, happy to do the work.

    Cities are often open to save money by doing their own installations.

    Joe Crumley
    www.nomansignco.com
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Pro Signs, Coal CIty IL
    Posts
    294

    Default

    I'm just a 1 man shop and have always done my own installations . I too quote the sign installation price separate on the quote, so they know up front. Gives them the option to save a few bux, and saves me the headache of explaining after the fact. I learned that lesson early on, "never assume". I enjoy installations, unless the weather isn't cooperating. Nothing more relaxing to me, than to take a Friday afternoon off from the shop to go install a sign. Work at my own pace and enjoy the outdoors. Over the years I've built stuff for the Bobcat to take the heavy lifting out of the job. Everything fits on the trailer. Scaffold, Forks, Bucket, Hydrostatic auger, back hoe, post installation attachment and a few small tools to make the job easy for 1 person. I hope to continue as long as I can. I'll be semi-retired in a few months so, when it becomes a chore, I'll give it up.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norman, Ok
    Posts
    3,251

    Default

    Gary,

    My hats off to you. I admire your business and wish we had more fellows like you posting. Like you I'm, a single man operation but it's been close to twenty years since I dug a post hole. In my community I can call for help with installation and routing service. On mornings like this, 36 degrees or during the summer heat it seems smart to call for assistance. But most one man operations do their own installations so you're not alone. I'm the odd man out.

    Recovery:
    At one time sandblasted, redwood, signs was a hot item. That phase has gone away however I'm getting calls to recover many of them from neglect. It's a good, fun, process and it seems there aren't many people wanting to get involved. The price is approx half the cost for a new sign. A well made redwood panel can last thirty years but they need a little maintenance. It's not too hard to make one look like new and extend years to their life.

    I'll never retire! It's too much fun and pays well too. With my pencil, computer and bag of brushes I can go on for a while.

    Joe

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    gleason, wi 54435
    Posts
    430

    Default

    Joe I still make wood signs and quite a few people still like them. Cedar is not as good as redwood but it still works. I need to be more explicit separating posts from signs as a couple customers have assumed posts were included.
    Gary that is one awesome setup for sign installs and probably many other jobs.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norman, Ok
    Posts
    3,251

    Default

    Bob,

    I'm glad you're still using wood on your excellent signs. About 70% of my work is still wood. Like you say Redwood is a superior product but rough cedar now the material of choice. The days of vertical grain, clear heart, redwood has come to an end. It's the price. But, if you have a router there are excellent options. Now I like some knots and I look for them when choosing my wood. It's the exciting wood grain with knots I'm looking for today. I'd use even more Yellow Pine if it wasn't so darn heavy. It's an excellent wood that will last outdoors. This is cheap wood and tough as nails.

    Here in my area Rough Red Cedar is cheap. It often comes wet. Not kiln dried. It glue's up well with Plastic Resin Glue and will last for years without problems. To get the fine detail we love you might consider inlays. I often use DiBond or HDU for that. All my HDU is covered with epoxy or PB hard coat.

    Although I no longer have a CNC, it's vitally important to have that experience to initiate the creativity necessary to make signs that stand away. Without first hand experience you won't understand the limits. Ownership is the only way to really know what's possible. When setting in front of Aspire there's a magic key. That key is Hands on Experience.

    Joe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    gleason, wi 54435
    Posts
    430

    Default

    yes Joe there are many species that make nice signs. I usually use cedar because it has the reputation of being durable but my house is white pine log siding that has been there for 15 years with no sign of rot. you can achieve pretty fine detail in cedar if you slow your cut way down like 1 inch per second or slower. I use more synthetics lately for inlays also. PVC corian aluminum all perform well.

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