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Thread: What is the right - best bit ?????

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    walnut grove, ga
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    5

    Default What is the right - best bit ?????

    What is the best bit to cut 3/4" pine plywood ? Will be cutting out parts for cabinets. Best speeds and feed rates ?

    What is the best bit to use for cutting 3/4" PVC???? Best speeds , feeds and depth of cut ????

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Round Rock, TX
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    11

    Default

    What CNC Machine are you using? ShopBot Standard or Alpha?
    ShopBot PRS Standard 48x96
    HSD 2.2hp Spindle; Vacuum Table

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    cnc routing, portland or
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    3,628

    Default

    do you have a vacuum table? if it is smooth you can use a 2f downcut bit. I usually use a 1/4" bit to keep parts in place. two passes one climb almost through one regular through 3ips. 10k a compression bit is really good but it can cause parts to move more.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Beckwith Decor Products, Derby/Wichita KS
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    605

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    For the plywood 60-123PLR, 3/8" 2 flute mortise compression, 546ipm 14400 rpm one pass to 3/4"
    For the pvc 52-709, 3/8" 2 flute upcut spiral O flute for single pass 250ipm 12500rpm
    for 1/4" tooling go to the 63-700 series for the pvc
    Gary
    Beckwith Decor Products
    Caveco Distributor, USA
    Custom CNC Tooling/Onsrud Distributor


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Diamond Lake, WA
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    1,615

    Default

    If using a PRSAlpha that is well tuned up, you can use a good quality 2-flute 1/4" compression bit at 5-6IPS/14K RPM. I cut hundreds of sheets of plywood in to cabinet parts every year and always climb cut first, leaving a 1/32" skin, then conventional cut 1/32" thru the material. My first pass is done in 2 passes so as to not flex the machine too much. The purpose of the two-pass system is to help compensate for the flex in the machine. When I use this method the edges are really crisp and right on the money. I can go straight from the CNC to the edgebander. As far as plastic, I haven't done enough to really perfect the process yet.
    Don
    Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks, LLC
    www.dlwoodworks.com
    ***********************************
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece; But to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, bank accounts empty, credit cards maxed out, defiantly shouting "Geronimo"!

    If you make something idiot proof, all they do is create a better idiot.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    walnut grove, ga
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rtalexand View Post
    What CNC Machine are you using? ShopBot Standard or Alpha?
    alpha 4 hp spindle 4' x 8'

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Delray Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,708

    Default

    How far are you going with your cabinet parts design?
    Line boring for system screws for drawer hardware and also shelf pins is standard at 5mm. For that Centurion tools makes an excellent 5 mm compression bit that can do the whole job for you.
    It takes a bit more cutting time for cutting your parts out than a larger bit would but you can process the whole job with no bit changes. or additional machining.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    77

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    May I ask, please, what is a "Climb Cut?"
    Can that be explained?

    We cut maple plywood everyday. Using a 1/4" straight cutter.
    We drop down through the plywood 0.125" with each pass running at 60 ipm and 15k speed.
    To get through 5/8" plywood, it takes 5 passes.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by woodshop; 01-22-2019 at 07:00 AM. Reason: additional text
    Dave B
    New Mexico
    Our most important shop tool is the pencil sharpener!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Beckwith Decor Products, Derby/Wichita KS
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    605

    Default

    Its the direction of cut, Climb is clockwise on the outside counterclockwise on the inside, the opposite is conventional cut
    Gary
    Beckwith Decor Products
    Caveco Distributor, USA
    Custom CNC Tooling/Onsrud Distributor


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
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    Default

    Thanks, garyb.
    Not sure why we would want to use a climb cut, though.
    "Google Search Time."
    Dave B
    New Mexico
    Our most important shop tool is the pencil sharpener!

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