Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Burn Stamp: Raised Letters on Brass

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    690

    Default Burn Stamp: Raised Letters on Brass

    This was an interesting project. I've never done raised letters and I've never worked with brass. Two new things. Pretty rare these days.

    I ran into an issue making raised letters. There is no toolpath that I could see that would make them. V-carve toolpath makes cut-in letters only. Maybe I missed something there. Pocketing out the background to leave a raised letters was the only thing that had possibilities but when I tried to go full depth with one tool path, this is what I got:

    Stamp-Pocket-full.jpg

    Obviously, not any good. So I tried just doing a bit at a time, in this case, 0.01" at a pass and creating a toolpath for each successive bite into the brass. I wanted to go down 0.07" so that led to seven tool paths. I combined them into a single path and ran the file. Here's the results in Aspire:

    Stamp-Pocket-progressive.jpg

    I used a 60 degree V-carve bit, one I had obtained from another SB'er who sent me bits to be sharpened and the result was this stamp:

    Stamp.jpg

    (2" wide, 1/2" thick bar stock "Machining" brass)

    When heated with a torch and pressed into wood, this is how it looks:

    Stamp-results.jpg

    This was my first attempt and in the future, I'll roll it back and forth a bit to give it a more even depth. The worst part of the job was the smoke that came out of the wood and got in my eyes! Shouldn't have been standing directly over the darn thing. My bad there.

    Question: Any better way of making raised letters with a V-carve bit?
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hobby-Tronics, Chiloquin Oregon
    Posts
    1,221

    Default

    I am by no means an expert at this but . . .Since your signature says you have Aspire here is how I would approach this task. Russ
    Look at the example:

    First I would POCKET the OUTSIDE of the letters to the INSIDE of the rectangle

    Then I would VCARVE on the LINE the outline of the letters to the same depth I pocketed the rectangle

    You will need to experiment with depths so that they match the width of the letter parts. IE if the width of the vertical part of the T is .25 I would start with a depth of half of that or .125 for both the POCKET and VCARVE.

    Like I said I am no expert. Have fun I hope this helps. Sometimes you have to just step back and let Aspire do the work! Russ
    Attached Images Attached Images
    AKA: The Train Guy

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chiloquinruss View Post
    I am by no means an expert at this but . . .Since your signature says you have Aspire here is how I would approach this task. Russ
    Look at the example:

    First I would POCKET the OUTSIDE of the letters to the INSIDE of the rectangle

    Then I would VCARVE on the LINE the outline of the letters to the same depth I pocketed the rectangle

    You will need to experiment with depths so that they match the width of the letter parts. IE if the width of the vertical part of the T is .25 I would start with a depth of half of that or .125 for both the POCKET and VCARVE.

    Like I said I am no expert. Have fun I hope this helps. Sometimes you have to just step back and let Aspire do the work! Russ
    That would work if the font was large and each letter had continuous width. I used a truetype font and the width of the letters varied and was quite small. The finished piece as only 2" x 3". The method I used worked satisfactorily.

    It seems there is a bug in Aspire. It should have been smart enough to handle the full depth tool path since it worked by creating a separate tool path for each pass. If this was a more complex project that had a deeper cut, it might have gotten tedious to create so many tool paths but in this case, I only needed seven.

    Thanks for looking at it though.
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Rogers, Arkansas
    Posts
    1,004

    Default

    When I did it, I used a vcarve toolpath with flat depth. Just set an outer 'border' vector sightly larger than the material so it pocketed it all away but the raised letters.
    Ken Zey
    Lookout Mercantile / Digital Millwork
    Rogers, AR
    www.CedarSlabSigns.com
    www.lookoutmercantile.com
    www.digitalmillwork.com

    6x12 PRS alpha

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    690

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zeykr View Post
    When I did it, I used a vcarve toolpath with flat depth. Just set an outer 'border' vector sightly larger than the material so it pocketed it all away but the raised letters.
    Yup. That worked. Will remember for next time. Thanks!
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    690

    Default

    I made another stamp using the V-carve toolpath. Worked better. Oddly, I broke the tip off the bit in the first two minutes. This same bit ran fine for the two hours it took to carve the first stamp. I ran a tiny bit deeper with the V-carve toolpath (0.011 vs. 0.010) but other than that, everything was the same. After sharpening the bit back to a nice point, I cut the speed in half (6 ips to 3 ips) and the job ran to completion without breaking anything.

    Here's the resulting chunk of brass:

    IMG_20190313_165056.jpg
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hampton Roads, VA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default

    Look at prism letters in aspire. Or you can use the modeling feature and extrude the letters from the 3d surface.

    Example I did recently using the extrusion method.

    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Once a person moves away from the computer and CNC some of the most important work begins." ~Joe Crumley

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •