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Thread: Mitering advice needed.....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    7,830

    Default Mitering advice needed.....

    Ok it's been at least 20 years since i had to do this last and frankly i have forgotten how to compensate for the differences so i need your advice.
    I am putting up trim along the base of the staircase along a sheetrock wall with a 3.5" wide baseboard with a trim cap on top. (i'm using flat wood, what you see is scrap used to get my angles correct.)

    It is a 40 degree angle where the two meet but by butting them up together you see the height difference? My vague recollection was somehow you split the difference and cut both at an angle and the joint is not a 90 degree straight up and down joint. how do i do this?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    US
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    Continue the angled trim line down to where it meets the top of the bottom trim. Red line.
    Your angle is the green line.




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    7,830

    Default

    This was my basic reccollection like you illustrate, so if the right piece angle is 40 degrees, if i cut both pieces at corresponding 20 degree angles would that work? i'll try that and let you know.
    Words of Wisdom:
    “Words that sink into your ears are whispered…… not yelled”
    “The biggest trouble maker you’ll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every morn’n”
    “The only difference between a rut and a grave is the depth”
    -----------
    Just remember...when it's time for the hearse to pull up..there's no luggage rack on top!
    -----------
    The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it...Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
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    695

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    The most useful tool in my shop for doing miters is the 12" disk sander...
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    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Hampton Roads, VA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by myxpykalix View Post
    Ok it's been at least 20 years since i had to do this last and frankly i have forgotten how to compensate for the differences so i need your advice.
    I am putting up trim along the base of the staircase along a sheetrock wall with a 3.5" wide baseboard with a trim cap on top. (i'm using flat wood, what you see is scrap used to get my angles correct.)

    It is a 40 degree angle where the two meet but by butting them up together you see the height difference? My vague recollection was somehow you split the difference and cut both at an angle and the joint is not a 90 degree straight up and down joint. how do i do this?
    I'll either help or look like a fool for not explaining this well.

    First you need to figure out the angle. For discussions sake that looks like a 45* angle. So you need a 22.5*, or half, angle to properly mate your joint. Get that protractor out. Or a great shortcut, should you find yourself sans protractor, put a piece of wide tape or paper on the proposed angle. Mark the angle by creasing the paper or marking the tape. Then lay the paper or tape on your miter saw and read the angle off the bed. Once you know the angle divide by two and viola. Works for me when I am trimming boat interiors.
    "Once a person moves away from the computer and CNC some of the most important work begins." ~Joe Crumley

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Delray Beach, FL
    Posts
    3,708

    Default

    google "how to bisect an angle".
    A protractor is your friend.
    There are also charts available on line for how to set up your chop saw for compound angles.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    "8Ball's" illustration confirmed my original contention (whoever said "a picture is worth a thousand words" was right!). I took my digital angle finder and found that the angle was 40 degrees, so i divided that in half, set the saw to 20 degrees, cut both ends to the corresponding left/right angle and it fit perfectly. This house was built in 1892 but every joint on the staircase was still a perfect angle. Thanks for all the advice
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Words of Wisdom:
    “Words that sink into your ears are whispered…… not yelled”
    “The biggest trouble maker you’ll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every morn’n”
    “The only difference between a rut and a grave is the depth”
    -----------
    Just remember...when it's time for the hearse to pull up..there's no luggage rack on top!
    -----------
    The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they try to take it...Thomas Jefferson

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    695

    Default

    I did a lot of work (especially trim) on my mother-in-law's house that was built in 1810. I was amazed at how straight and level everything was. The beams in the walls were all oak and the house was built directly on a granite slab miles thick. The foundation was made of stacked slate with no mortar. The house was originally an inn.
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

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