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Thread: How to check for offset-mode inside a sbp file... ?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Ahh! That makes a lot of sense!

    I had to do something similar when I had an air drill setup on my SB controller. Did you ever look into any of the air drill offset stuff?

    It sounds like what you did totally solved the problem. When I had the air drill setup I had to hack my Vectric post a lot to get it to work like I wanted to, but then when I went to use Fusion 360 it didn't work the way I wanted, so for me I went back and messed around a lot with the built in air drill scripts. That way no matter what CAM I used my drill would work the same way.

    Changing the Vectric post like you did is in my opinion the much easier way to do it, but if you ever wanted to use a different CAM software there is some more hackery you could do

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Kennebunkport, Maine
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    Marc,
    Might it be worthwhile to see if Vectric's new "Laser Module" might be worth your while?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eAsAFWtBNc
    scott P.
    2013 Desktop/spindle/VCP 10
    Maine

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Victoriaville, QC, Canada
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    Hello Scottp55,

    I was not aware of those features, thanks.

    I guess that works for the latest VCarve version like 10.something... I am still using 8.5 and I don't want to pay that much money for the new version...

    Now I do most of my work with Fusion but I find myself going back to Vcarve often anyway.

  4. #14
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    Yes Marc...That was brand new with 10.5**
    Price WAS steep going from Shopbot Edition, but I'm active on the Vectric Forum and like to be able to open all the files.
    After the sticker shock was gone.....I'm still glad I stayed current so my file drawing speed stays up with the new features

    Just thought I'd mention that.
    scott P.
    2013 Desktop/spindle/VCP 10
    Maine

  5. #15
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    Marc, what are you designing and cutting in Fusion? And what brings you back to Vcarve instead of Fusion?

  6. #16
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    Victoriaville, QC, Canada
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    Well Eric, most of my work is lutherie. I build mostly archtop guitars and some solidbody (electric) ones. Note that I don't do this professionnally. I sold only a very few right now but I am working on producing more as I get better at it and wish to sell some of my limited production.

    I am retired from computer engineering, always palyed guitar and had some woodworking experience. Learning software like Fusion is not that difficult for me neither is the numeric technology.

    So in Fusion, I design some guitar parts that are 3D like necks and bodies for electric guitars. I use it also for tools or jigs that I need (like radius blocks for the fretboard, etc.). I tend to prefer Fusion when the design has 3D, when it needs more precision and when I plan on reusing a design for a long time.

    Sometimes I just need to create a simple toolpath, like facing a small block of wood for glueing or cutting a simple template, so I tend to go back to VCarve for that. I feel that for a very simple 2D one-shot job, VCarve might be faster. Also, for engraving, I often feel that the VCarve Guick Engraving toolpath is easier to use than the equivalent in Fusion.

    But I really like how Fusion integrates the design, rendering, manufacturing and also the drawings, not to mention the more powerfull toolpath options.

    What to YOU do in Fusion ? I am curious too.

  7. #17
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    That answer makes a lot of sense to me. Fusion is pretty good at stuff like guitars, and it makes sense to use the built in CAM for that sort of thing.

    I find where Fusion really falls down is multi-part stuff. Big sheets of material, stuff that you want to move around a lot, etc are all doable in Fusion, but a pain.

    My use case is about the same as you, if I'm doing a single part thing that's pretty complex, or my source file is a STEP file I'll use Fusion. The rest of the things I cut are wither with my own CAM software or Aspire.

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