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Thread: Becker vac pump noise level

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Pennsauken, NJ
    Posts
    11

    Default Becker vac pump noise level

    Hi all

    I'm nearly finished with the assembly of my new Bot (6x10 PRS alpha, ATC and spindle motor). I'm wondering how loud the Becker regenerative vac pump really is. From the looks of the thing I'm afraid it will sound like a jet engine when on. I checked with Becker and they want a fortune for an enclosure - over $3k and it's several months off anyway. I'm going to be running a spindle motor plus 2hp dust collector, air compressor and the vac pump. I know that we'll need ear protection near the machine but am concerned that my secretary won't be able to hear anything in the office when everything is running.

    Now I am assuming I'm going to have to put insulation in the office walls and on top but am afraid I'll be forced to run the machine at night when no one is around. Thoughts?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    River Fall WI
    Posts
    784

    Default

    It will be loud, but I'm guessing you run a shop so loud should not be a problem. That said Insulation in the office wall might be nice but if you did not need it before for your shop you should not need it now.

    Whatever you do make sure to watch your cnc, they can start on fire very fast and even faster with a vac pump.
    Kyle Stapleton
    River Falls Renaissance Academy
    Math/Technology Education Teacher


    PRS Alpha 96x60 2.2 hp spindle, Double Air drills, 6" indexer, Fein 5 zone vac table
    Desktop w/spindle
    Potter Pen
    Aspire 8.5, Creo 3.0

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Buford, GA
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Yes. Mine just started on fire yesterday. First time in a long while, but it sure did.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Pennsauken, NJ
    Posts
    11

    Default

    What are you folks cutting that caused the machine to catch fire? Or was it the materials?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Memphis TN
    Posts
    874

    Default

    The only fire I've had involved a piece of oak I was milling with a 1/8" cutter. The hold down broke free and the piece moved with the cutter, causing it to stay in the same place for several seconds. Smoke came billowing up from the work and into the dust collector. Although I wasn't really paying attention (sanding something nearby), I smelled smoke coming out of the dust collector and hit the red button. The smoke stopped almost as soon as the machine came to a halt. I suppose if I hadn't been aware of the problem, the fire would have escalated as there was plenty of air and fuel to go along with the ignition.

    I've also had some pretty significant jolts from static electricity that might have been dangerous in a dusty environment. I keep my shop pretty clean so that potential is not present.

    Tips for keeping the shop from burning down:

    1. Keep your shop clean. Clean up before and after every project.
    2. Keep an eye, ear and nose on the work when the machine is running.
    3. Be sure your machine is well grounded. Static sparks can cause an explosion if there's enough fuel around. Dust in the air is fuel.
    4. Have a good size fire extinguisher within easy reach.
    5. Keep your shop clean. This is really the best advice.
    ShopBot Details:
    PRS Alpha 96x60x12
    4hp Spindle
    12" indexer
    Aspire
    Rhino

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Buford, GA
    Posts
    29

    Default

    The first time mine started on fire (yeah, I know) was when I was plunging with a compression bit. That's when I learned you DON'T plunge holes with a compression bit. First hole was fine. Second okay. Third black. Fourth glowing red. Scared the **** out of me, ruined the spoilboard, but mercifully did not damage the plenum (which is made of MEDEX MDF, sealed with wood glue). Boy would THAT have gone up quickly.

    This time I literally have no idea why it started. I'm cutting 3/4" plywood, and am using a Freud 1/4" two-flute straight bit. Perhaps it was getting dull, but it was still cutting fine. I didn't notice it immediately because it kept cutting the sheet to the completion of the program. I only looked over there when the router turned off after cutting and saw the thin plume of smoke coming out. The ONLY thing I can think of is that it maybe hit a knot in the plywood that had a bunch of dried sap, which maybe ignited from the heat where the rest of the wood did not.

    Andy

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