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Thread: Anyone with a 2005 era Alpha PRT series cutting 3d models with no issues?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
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    7

    Default Anyone with a 2005 era Alpha PRT series cutting 3d models with no issues?

    I have a 2005 Alpha PRT 96 with the ASM11 motors, and I'm having issues with it leaving random lines(like gouge lines) in 3D Carves. I'm not looking for "fix it" answers here, but here to ask if anyone else is having or has had issues with theirs doing this? I'm basically being told I need to change all the motors, controller and basically most everything about the machine to not have the issue I'm having. I guess I'm not wanting to accept that my machine isn't capable of putting out perfect 3d carves.

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Marietta GA
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    482

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    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Krueger View Post
    I have a 2005 Alpha PRT 96 with the ASM11 motors, and I'm having issues with it leaving random lines(like gouge lines) in 3D Carves. I'm not looking for "fix it" answers here, but here to ask if anyone else is having or has had issues with theirs doing this? I'm basically being told I need to change all the motors, controller and basically most everything about the machine to not have the issue I'm having. I guess I'm not wanting to accept that my machine isn't capable of putting out perfect 3d carves.

    Thanks in advance!
    There’s quite a few factors outside of the machine itself that determine how perfectly a 3D carve can go. Material and heat/humidity are two biggies that come to mind.

    As for the machine, I just posted some 3D stuff that my old 2004 PRT (not alpha) can do in my “Big Blue” thread.

    I built a centroid based controller for it a few years ago, but used the gecko drives that were used in the prt 4g upgrade controller Shopbot offered a few years ago, and I bought some newer (Shopbot, used) steppers for my x axis off the forum here. I reused all the original Shopbot cables and proximity sensors and stuff.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
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    7

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    Thanks, I looked at that thread. Nice stuff!

    Do you happen to have a list of the specific parts you replaced?

    I'm up in the air about either buying another smaller machine just for 3d or trying to upgrade this one. I got a quote from GCnC for about $5500. ouch!

    Thanks,

    Quote Originally Posted by robtown View Post
    There’s quite a few factors outside of the machine itself that determine how perfectly a 3D carve can go. Material and heat/humidity are two biggies that come to mind.

    As for the machine, I just posted some 3D stuff that my old 2004 PRT (not alpha) can do in my “Big Blue” thread.

    I built a centroid based controller for it a few years ago, but used the gecko drives that were used in the prt 4g upgrade controller Shopbot offered a few years ago, and I bought some newer (Shopbot, used) steppers for my x axis off the forum here. I reused all the original Shopbot cables and proximity sensors and stuff.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Marietta GA
    Posts
    482

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Krueger View Post
    Thanks, I looked at that thread. Nice stuff!

    Do you happen to have a list of the specific parts you replaced?

    I'm up in the air about either buying another smaller machine just for 3d or trying to upgrade this one. I got a quote from GCnC for about $5500. ouch!

    Thanks,
    It was three years ago, so I do not.

    I did what they call a “build thread” over at centroid’s forum that pretty much chronicles my build from start to finish. It probably has a pretty good list of all that went into it.

    It will also feature a lot of good advice from Gary Campbell and Mike Richards and all the others over there.

    I believe one of the last posts in my thread, I tallied up the project and it turned out I really didn’t save anything doing it myself versus just buying a GcCNC controller at the price they had quoted. And it took a month or two, maybe three.

    But I’m a hobbyist so it wasn’t a problem having my machine in pieces for that long. And I wanted to build it myself for fun.

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